The Art of Giving

This year, my friends and I will watch three of our children walk across that stage, and graduate from high school. We’ve already started planning their graduation parties and comparing notes. Being a single mom…it can be a little overwhelming — the invitations, decorations, food, etc. But it’ll get done.

As I sat there looking at my “to do” list, I received a phone call from my friend Michele. She said “Ok, here’s the deal…” then rattled off at least a half-a-dozen dishes that her and the girls are bringing to my son’s party. The next day I had more offers from my family and neighbors. So, it looks like I can breathe a sigh of relief.

I don’t know how I got so lucky, but my friends and family are always there when I need them. I don’t even have to ask. And I’m not sure if they’ll ever really know how grateful I am. That’s why I’m writing this post.

They have mastered the “art of giving.”

Giving, because you see the need.
Helping, because you can.
Expecting, nothing in return.

But, of course, if you can pay it forward — you do. And I will.

Last year I had a similar experience. I ended up in the hospital, unexpectedly, and was out of work for weeks. Again, these “angels on earth” came to my rescue.

  • Someone to bring me to the emergency room — and patiently stay with me for hours on end, not knowing what to expect.
  • Someone waiting at my hospital room, to greet me — as I was being admitted.
  • Someone to support me, by arriving late at night just to walk beside me as I was wheeled into surgery — and to stay with me until they knew I was okay.
  • Someone to visit with me, and bring me the make-up I so desperately needed — while cheering me up the following day.
  • Someone to take the day off of work — just to drive me home.
  • And someone who (anonymously) donated all of their vacation time at work — so I wouldn’t lose a paycheck.

All Angels.

It didn’t stop there. Once home I had dinners delivered, groceries dropped off, visitors to check on me, flowers to brighten my day, and a personal chauffeur since I wasn’t allowed to drive. I don’t know what I would’ve done without them.

So, to my friends and family, I want to say “thank you — from the bottom of my heart.”

And I hope, that others are inspired by you. You’re the best!

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18 thoughts on “The Art of Giving

    1. Awww, thank you! I was able to find out who donated all of that vacation time (I’m kind of a Nancy Drew mystery solver too). It honestly made me cry – so sweet. There was two of them, and luckily I was able to thank them. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  1. In times of great need you discover who you can really rely upon. It sounds like you have an abundance of riches in that territory.
    Having said that though, I think what you send out into the world is what tends to come back to you … so the kindness of your family and friends is as much a reflection on you as it is on them ❤

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  2. LIfe is like this, Debbie. They know you’d be there for them. Good friends aren’t just there to laugh at the good times, but help shovel the crap, too. Thank you, Debbie’s friends for being true-blue. This reminds me of when my dear wife Karen fell and broke her knee cap a few years ago, and when I brought her home from the operation, up pulled her great friend Laurie’s husband, the owner and chef at a local Italian place. All of Karen’s friends at work had chipped in, and Sam had cooked, and he had a dozen boxes of his restaurant specialties for us. I had to go buy a freezer for our porch! I was the king of reheating as she recuperated and we were the best fed. We rock in the friendship category in Syracuse.

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    1. We do rock!! There’s just something about Syracusians!! And I notice as we grow older, our high school graduating class (thanks to Facebook) are always there for one another when help is needed, even if they live out-of-state. It’s inspiring to say the least. 🙂 It’s like having 400 siblings saying “What can I do to help?” ha!

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      1. You’re really lucky about that, Debbie. I’m a transplant. I moved here in 1983. But still … This year is my 40 year HS year, on Long Island. Double Oy. Don’t even know if there’s a reunion.

        Liked by 1 person

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